Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

The NRCS recruits professionals from a very wide range of backgrounds. Our staff include everyone from humanitarian aid workers, interpreters and engineers to surgeons, agronomists. Please refer to our job openings to check specific requirements in terms of training, experience and language skills.

For our mobile entry-level positions, we require at least two years' post-graduate experience. This requirement may be higher for some specialist positions, such as engineers, logisticians or medical workers. Greater professional experience may be required for senior positions.

Please note that internships may count towards the professional experience required, depending on what they involve and providing they last at least six months.

Please note that our recruiters evaluate applications as a whole. To succeed, you'll need the right combination of motivation, professional and personal experience, and language and soft skills.
English is the official languages of the NRCS. A very good knowledge of both languages is, therefore, highly recommended and sometimes required. Exceptions may be made for some specific jobs.
Recruitment for mobile field positions usually follows this order:
  • Screening – We select candidates for interview.
  • Interviews – Candidates have a general interview with a recruiter and/or a technical interview with experts for specialist positions.
  • Language tests – We test candidates' language skills.
  • Technical tests (optional)

Interviews can be done either at our headquarters or via Skype/phone, depending on where you are based. Candidates are expected to cover their own recruitment-related expenses.

If you were not short-listed, it probably means that you do not match our requirements. If you later improve your language skills, gain more work experience and meet our criteria, you are welcome to apply again.


However, we recommend you do not reapply for at least six months. This is because, generally speaking, we don't think that any significant change can occur in a CV before then.

If you were not short-listed, it probably means that you do not match our requirements. If you later improve your language skills, gain more work experience and meet our criteria, you are welcome to apply again.


However, we recommend you do not reapply for at least six months. This is because, generally speaking, we don't think that any significant change can occur in a CV before then.

Our mobile staff are often posted to remote areas where health-care services may be limited.


To minimize the risk of medical issues arising while you're in the field, you must get medical clearance before you go.


For more information, please see our medical standards.

We take our staff's safety very seriously. We are constantly monitoring the situation and adapting our security rules – by having curfews, restricting the use of public transport, etc. We expect every staff member to abide by our security rules and ensure others do so as well

Another vital aspect of our staff's safety is the NRCS's reputation as a neutral and impartial organization, which allows us to work in areas where we might otherwise be unwelcome. We therefore ask our staff not to make any public political statements that could harm how our organization is perceived, and which would undermine our work.

 Yes, unfortunately we can all can catch coronavirus, men and women, young and old, no

matter where we come from or what race we are

The coronavirus comes from the same family of viruses as the cold or flu, so just as anyone

can catch a cold, they can also catch coronavirus

The virus has now spread to 196 countries around the world, and people from all continents

have been affected, including Africans, Asians, Americans and Europeans.

The first case of coronavirus in Kenya was a 27-year old African lady who had flown home

from the USA via London to Kenya

The first death in Zimbabwe due to coronavirus was a 30-year old African man who had

recently returned to his home in Zimbabwe after visiting a country with coronavirus cases

Although everyone can catch and spread coronavirus to others, elderly people or those with

existing illnesses, such a high blood pressure and diabetes, are more at risk as they seem to

get more ill from the virus

So no matter where you come from, it is important that you follow the five simple rules below to keep yourself and your family safe particularly your older relatives or those with

existing illnesses. 

Yes, unfortunately we can all can catch coronavirus, men and women, young and old, no

matter where we come from or what race we are

The coronavirus comes from the same family of viruses as the cold or flu, so just as anyone

can catch a cold, they can also catch coronavirus

The virus has now spread to 196 countries around the world, and people from all continents

have been affected, including Africans, Asians, Americans and Europeans.

The first case of coronavirus in Kenya was a 27-year old African lady who had flown home

from the USA via London to Kenya

The first death in Zimbabwe due to coronavirus was a 30-year old African man who had

recently returned to his home in Zimbabwe after visiting a country with coronavirus cases

Although everyone can catch and spread coronavirus to others, elderly people or those with

existing illnesses, such a high blood pressure and diabetes, are more at risk as they seem to

get more ill from the virus

So no matter where you come from, it is important that you follow the five simple rules

below to keep yourself and your family safe particularly your older relatives or those with

existing illnesses. 

1. Coronavirus is not a man-made disease.


2. Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that cause different illnesses from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) which caused an outbreak in 2012 and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV) which caused an outbreak in 2002/2003.


3. Coronaviruses are known to jump from animals to humans and it is believed that the disease began when workers at a seafood market in Wuhan, got this disease from the animals they were in contact with.


4. Nature is always producing new viruses and unfortunately, this coronavirus is just another example of how clever nature can be.